Justice Department Resolves Allegations of Discrimination with Healthcare Firm in Connecticut

The Justice Department reached a settlement agreement today with a healthcare staffing company based in Wilton, Conn., resolving allegations that the company posted discriminatory job advertisements on its home page and third party websites that limited its jobs to U.S. citizens.

According to the department’s investigation, over a one year period, thousands of the company’s job postings impermissibly limited applications to U.S. citizens, even though work-authorized immigrants, such as lawful permanent residents, asylees and refugees, should have been allowed to apply as well.  The Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) generally prohibits employers from discriminating on the basis of citizenship status unless required by law, regulation or government contract.  The department determined that the company had no legal basis for its stated citizenship preference.

“Federal law protects people who are authorized to work in the United States from facing discriminatory barriers when they are seeking employment,” said Thomas E. Perez, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division.  “Employers should ensure that their online job postings do not violate the anti-discrimination provision of Immigration and Nationality Act.”

Under the terms of the settlement agreement, the company has agreed to pay $100,000 in civil penalties, to change its internal policies and manuals to reflect the INA’s protections, and to be subject to reporting and compliance monitory requirements for a period of three years.

The Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair Employment Practices (OSC) is responsible for enforcing the anti-discrimination provisions of the INA, which protect U.S. citizens and certain work-authorized individuals from citizenship status discrimination.  The INA also protects work-authorized individuals from national origin discrimination, over-documentation in the employment eligibility verification process and retaliation.

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